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Daisy and Violet Take a Stand

5 Aug

…And we stand against Chik-fil-a and their supporters.

This is not a free-speech argument. Nobody denies Chik-fil-a owner Dan Cathy his right to his opinion (no matter how stupid and ignorant it may be.)

We stand against a company which puts money into Cathy’s pockets. We stand against Cathy donating said money to organizations which support hate initiatives. What are we talking about, here? The Marriage and Family Coalition, started by Cathy, which is supported by Alan Chambers, president of Exodus International. What does Exodus International do? They promote “ex-gay” therapy, to “pray the gay away.” (Makes me wonder if we can “pray the Black away” or “pray the Jewish away.” Why don’t we just “pray” every time we encounter a people group that doesn’t fit in with our morals or ideals?) They call it “Set Free;” does anyone else find the irony in that?

He donates money to the National Christian Foundation, which in turn supported Focus on the Family. What did they do that pissed off your favorite heterosexual life partners? They stood in support of the Defense of Marriage Act, which aims to define marriage as existing between one man and one woman, by law.

Cathy supports the Family Research Council. They’re such an outspoken voice against the gay community that the Southern Poverty Law Group actually added them to a list of “Hate Organizations,” right up there with the KKK.

Daisy and Violet know (because the word “believe” implies that there is subjectivity to the statement) that people are born gay. Hormones, brain chemistry, whatever; we’re not scientists. We’re bloggers. But something chemical makes some people sexually repulsed by the opposite gender and attracted to the same gender. We believe these people deserve the same civil rights as straight Americans.

Daisy and Violet also believe in the Constitution. We believe in the freedom of speech. We believe in Cathy’s right to make his statements. We believe in keeping the government out of American’s lives, just like the authors of the Constitution intended. We believe in Thomas Jefferson’s words: “separation of Church and State” (we hope you know that that does not appear anywhere in the Constitution, kiddos.) We want to keep Constitution out of our prayers and our beliefs out of the Constitution. Daisy and Violet believe that all Americans should enjoy the same basic rights, in spite of race, gender, creed, religion, or sexual preference.

A friend commented on Facebook recently, stating that she’s had two failed marriages, implying that as a heterosexual, she’s no better than anyone else at this ” til death do us part” stuff. What makes us think that the gay community won’t get it right?

 

(Violet would like to challenge her Christian readers in support of CFA to find one verse in the Bible where Jesus, not Paul or the random author(s) of Leviticus, speak against gay/lesbian relationships.)

An Ode to the Women Who Tolerate Us

23 Apr

Daisy and I were chatting today about friendship.

Well, not ours. We’re not friends; we’re heterosexual life partners.

We were talking about adult relationships with our childhood friends.

You see, Daisy and I each have one  friend who’s survived the murky waters of childhood, adolescence, those nasty teenage years, the rebellious post-high school mess, and adulthood. (Or, as Daisy puts it, “…friends since before I had hair on my twat.”) We call these two women, respectively, our best friends. And they are. But they almost weren’t.

Daisy’s Pre-Pube-Hair buddy surfaced in early elementary school. They went to middle school together, although she attended a different high school from Daisy and me. Even though this woman went to college several hundred miles away from Daisy, they maintained their friendship. Daisy confesses that their friendship endured some tumultuous times when their life paths drifted apart: Daisy jumped on the Weeds-esque suburban housewife train, while this woman pursued her education and then her career. Single and childless, she has made dramatically different life choices from Daisy.

My childhood BFF and I met in fifth grade. We played dolls together, took dance lessons together, and attended middle and high school together, only to part for undergrad. This woman has always been my “Jimminy Cricket,” so to speak. Unlike most people, I literally have an angel and a devil living on my shoulders, whispering suggestions into my ear. If Daisy is the devil, this woman is, and always was, the angel. I would skip school with Daisy during the day, then go to this girl’s house at night to cram for an AP exam. She and I are on similar life paths: we’re both wives and mothers, we have the same levels of education, and we’re in the same profession. In spite of all our commonalities, our friendship entered a decline.

Why does this happen, Daisy and I mused. How can we share so much history with these women, and harbor so much pure love for them, but not have the same quality of friendship we once shared? In Daisy’s case, she speculates that their diverging life plans kept them too preoccupied with different priorities to make time for one another. Between me and my Six Foot Conscience, we simply became too wrapped up in the day-to-day banalities of teaching, motherhood, and social obligations to remember to pick up the phone. These are simply excuses, and it doesn’t justify allowing our friendships to lapse like a magazine subscription you swear you’re going to renew.

Recent events have thrust these women back into our lives. Daisy and her friend have reconnected over – you guessed it – babies. This woman recently became an Auntie, and Daisy guided her through “What To Expect When Someone You Love Is Expecting.” The eternal expert on everything baby-related, this woman wisely turned to Daisy for information and guidance as she welcomed a new diaper-clad person in her life. My best friend and I had a bit of a spat, at the end of which we decided the only resolution was to make a commitment to one another to talk regularly (daily, if we could hack it with our conflicting schedules.) We realized that our friendship was in deep shit if we didn’t reach out to one another, and have upheld this bargain so far.

Daisy and I are learning how much work adult friendships are. Sure, fun-loving, personable girls such as Daisy and I have no problem making “friends” at work, play groups, or among other parents of children the same age as ours. But in a phase of life when one barely has time to take out the trash and scoop the litter box, do we really have the where-with-all to dedicate to new acquaintances? We agreed that it is crucial for us to nurture these respective friendships, if not for preserving their longevity, then because these women have loved us at our worst.

Tell us about how you’ve had to work to maintain important friendships in your life. We want to know we’re not curmudgeons. =]

Mommy Message Boards

15 Mar

After the sixth pregnancy test, I did what most twenty-first century Moms do: I went online and joined a pregnancy message board. It’s not something I would have normally done, but a close friend, who also happened to be pregnant, suggested it. Turns out, it was pretty fun. I enjoyed having a place to anonymously complain about the ins-and-outs of pregnancy. I liked hearing that other women were as constipated as I was. It made me feel better to learn that other couples were arguing over baby names, too. And yes, the catty little bitch-fits of “breast-feeders vs. formula feeders” kept me entertained while my fat ass was holed up on the couch.

After Pterodactyl was born, I continued to visit the site. Every mommy seemed to be on there at 3am. Like me, they were doing the mid-night zombie thing while feeding a colicky newborn. We shared our labor and delivery stories, and “oohed” and “aahed” at the lengths to which the others went to push a baby out.  When my breastfeeding attempts ended, I received plenty e-reassurances to make me feel like less of a failure. I’ve even made two “real” friends off the site, although due to the several thousand mile distances, we’ve only ever talked on the phone. These two mommies actually transitioned to my Facebook friends. (And I’m not one of those people who has all sorts of random strangers on her Facebook; I have fewer than 150 friends total, from high school, college, grad school, and work.)

I highly recommend joining one of these sites, for the aforementioned reasons. But take heed: some of these sites are just breeding grounds for stupidity, judgment, and internet trolls. While I was fortunate that my group of April 2011 mommies on What to Expect were some bad-ass chicks, other boards were not so blessed. I peeked in on the other boards, and some of those women are just bitchy bullies looking for victims. Think about it: if you’re on a pregnancy or new-mommy message board, the entire patronage of the website is women with an abundance of hormones. That’s a brew for evil, under normal circumstances.  I got lucky with my group of gals. You may not.

I’ll tell you who these sites are not for. They’re not for:

  • The overly-judgmental. By definition, you’re going to meet a slew of people from different backgrounds, socio-economic statuses, religions, political affiliations, and cultures. They’re going to do shit differently from you. If you can’t deal with that, or if you’re quick to condemn different lifestyles, stay away.
  • The easily-offended. If you plan to ask for advice or offer opinions, you’re likely to encounter someone who’ll say something you disagree with. The comment may be outright hurtful. I told you, there are catty bitches on these sites! If you’re inclined toward hurt feelings, don’t join a mommy blog.
  • Preachers. No, not people of the cloth; people with loud opinions. If you’re on a crusade to make everyone a vegetarian like you, or to convince people of the evils of disposable diapers, then you’re going to be met with aggression on Mommy forums.
  • Friend-Hunters. You mustn’t join a Mommy-board to make 196332 BFF’s. You’re just setting yourself up for disappointment if you join up thinking you’re going to walk away with sisters. This ain’t a sorority house. Most of these women want a place to anonymously vent, then go about their days. I was lucky to meet the two cool chicks that I met. Were they in my state, or vice versa, we’d probably have gotten together. I’m not buying a plane ticket to meet them or anything, but I do consider them “friends.” Do NOT expect that to happen for you, but if it does, cool shit.
  • Bullies. Nobody wants to deal with your shit. If you have aggression problems, go to therapy. Don’t bring your meanness to the mommy boards.

The unity of a collective due date brought us together. Almost a year later, the message board has died out some. Most of us are extremely busy with our almost-toddlers and life in general. But it’s nice to have an e-Cheers to go where everybody knows my name. When my kid enters a new and annoying phase, I can poll other women with 11 month olds to see if they’ve experienced the same headaches I am dealing with, and how they handled it. I’m sure that a year from now, save for another pregnancy, I’ll rarely visit www.whattoexpect.com, but the past 18 months of posts and e-friendships made it all worthwhile.

(Daisy Edit – As soon as I found out I was pregnant with Diva & Intuitive, (before I knew there were two of them!) I joined the now defunct AOL message boards. I am still great friends with many of those ladies, and that was 7.5 years ago! That message board was a great support system! We had our share of highs and lows.. from healthy babies to stillborn babies. Those relationships were amazing, and I am so happy I joined.)

What mommy message boards have you joined? Did they suck ass? Were they awesome? Tell us about them!

© Daisy and Violet 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Shit I Wish I Didn’t Buy (or Registration Remorse)

1 Mar

Every mother can identify with this, particularly first-time moms: At Babies ‘R Us or Target, they hand you the little registration gun and send you off. They make sure you’re armed with a little booklet called What Your New Baby Needs or Useless Shit We Want You to Buy. Before you know it, you’ve scanned every trinket in the store and then some. And God forbid it wasn’t purchased for you – you head straight to the store and buy it yourself. Most of this crap just ends up cluttering your nursery/living room/bathroom/kitchen until in a fit of organizational frenzy, you toss it in the trash. We’ve been there. We know. Here’s our list of shit you don’t really need, in hopes that your life may be a little less cluttered and a little more simple:

Daisy: In my experience, the damn changing table was the biggest waste of time, money, and space! As I sit here thinking about the changing table that took up space in both of my nurseries, and had maybe 10 diaper changes to its name… All I can think of is the incredible amount of times I stubbed my toes on it. With Diva & Intuiutive, I often used the changing table attachment of our wonderful Pack & Play. More often than that, I used the sofa or the floor. We lived on the huge, thick, soft quilt on the floor; Boppies, toys, and breast pump on the table nearby. Roly poly babies can’t fall off the floor. That was our world. Running to the nursery to change a kid on the changing table was a much bigger hassle, especially with another kid to mind. When Handsome came along, we were in a 2-story house, with all bedrooms upstairs. Again, we LIVED in the living room. Not once did I feel comfortable skipping up the steps to change Handsome’s diaper on the stupid changing table, and leaving Diva & Intuitive downstairs. I won’t convince most moms-to-be to forgo the changing table; I know that. It is definitely on the Babies R Us “things to get or your baby will need therapy” list.

Violet: The first thing I got rid of was the kid’s bathtub. I registered for this $40 tub that came with a matching frog sponge and an inclined baby rest. Guess what? I used the inclined rest and the froggy sponge while Pterodactyl bathed in my bathtub. Now that she can sit up, she bathes in the tub like any other kid. Where’s the baby bathtub? Well, for a while, it was living on the bathroom floor, plotting against my little toe (which has been stubbed indubitably by that damn piece of plastic). I think it’s made its way to the attic now. My advice? Invest in an incline rest for the kid, and put him in a normal bathtub. Fill the tub with about two inches of water. Problem solved.

Daisy: Looking back at my “point and shoot” frenzy with the Babies R Us registry gun, I regret making a loving friend or family member (it was 7 years ago, I really don’t remember who got it, or if we got it after the shower. Sorry. Mommy brain?) spend many, many dollars on two complete sets of matching bedding, sheets, dust ruffles, valances, etc. Sure, it was super cutesy and pink and green, but I think I would have been better off “designing” it myself, and not just taking everything out of the package. I could have made a truly unique room with some mixing and matching, especially since we never used half the crap that came with the set. The comforters? We hung them on the walls. That ridiculous excuse for a diaper holder? Uh, that would barely hold a day’s worth of diapers. With Handsome, I went off the grid. I got simple colors and made my own “theme” using big kid and grown up decor. Who’s room has seamlessly grown up with him? All we’ve had to change is the crib to a super cool bunk bed. Diva & Intuitive? All the crap from their nursery is on the top shelf of their closet. As much as I wish I would have done it differently, I just can’t bear to get rid of it. Hey, Violet, call Hoarders, stat.

Violet: Did I ever use the wipe warming machine I registered for? Once. When we first brought the baby home from the hospital, I stuffed the machine full of wipes, praising myself for considering every aspect of Pterodactyl’s comfort. The first time I used it, my baby had a warm, clean bum. The second time I used it, the wipes came out drier than Nancy Pelosi’s skin. I chucked it soon after. Room temperature wipes were fine for my munchkin, and if I thought they were a little too cool, I’d simply hold them between my hands for 10 seconds. Easy.

Daisy: For my kids, most of the little baby toys you find on the outer aisle of the baby section in Target held their attention for about 3 minutes. Total. Sure, they liked the big stuff, like the Excersaucer, but small toys? They just didn’t care. What did they love? An empty water bottle with a few pennies in it, sealed tight. (Adult supervision, please, obviously.) They would shake the damn bottle for HOURS.

Violet: At my baby shower, I received about ten pairs of adorable baby shoes, including a pair of precious ballerina slippers from my dance-instructor cousin. As delighted as I was to dress my babe up with cutesie little shoes, she was as delighted to kick them off and giggle while I scrambled to retrieve them. Solution? I got little socks with grippers on the bottom with shoe designs on them. (You know: little sneaker designs, Mary Janes, etc.) Now that she stands and half-walks, we’re back on the shoe train, but for 10 months, my kid went everywhere in these little faux shoes that were as cute as they were impossible for her to kick off.

Violet: My secret granola-hippie side loathes jarred baby food. When Pterodactyl was four months old, I ran to BRU and bought a Baby Bullet. I was going to make all her baby food from scratch, dammit! I was going to prepare them in bulk and freeze the excess! YES! Life got in the way, and pouches of Earth’s Best and Ella’s pureed baby foods lined my pantry. Did I make some of her baby food? Certainly. But not with that baby contraption, which lives in its box above my fridge. I used my trusty food processor, and you can, too.

Readers: Tell us what useless baby stuff clutters your life. All complaints are welcome!

© Daisy and Violet 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Some of our favorite kid stuff

29 Feb

Between the two of us, we have four kids. Fortunately for Violet, Daisy’s earlier ride on the Baby Train allowed for product recommendations with some savior-fare when it came time for Violet to breed. We thought we’d give you all the benefit of our experiences. Keep this list handy, as they’re excellent products which might make for valuable baby-shower gifts.

*Disclaimer: All of these products were purchased by Daisy and Violet for the sole intent of making baby and Mommy happy, with no ulterior motives nor incentives on the part of the producer. Any recommendations are made in good faith. Neither Daisy and Violet, nor the manufacturers, are responsible if this shit doesn’t work out for you like it did for us.

Baby Wearing:
Violet: Holy crap. Thank you, Daisy, for gifting your pouches to me at my baby shower. These things are a life-saver! In those first few weeks of Motherhood, I was able to nurse Pterodactyl in them. I was able to wear her and get housework done. The design of the pouch, as opposed to that Baby Bjorn shit, is conducive to sleeping, sitting up, and when the kid is old enough, back-wearing. It supports baby’s noggin in those first weeks of slinky-neck. Even to this day, I can go out in public wearing her to prevent grimy old people from touching my child. On occasion, I even “wear” her to sleep when she’s being extra fussy. The Rockin’ Baby Pouch (www.rockinbabysling.com) is as functional as it is pretty. Our shared pouch is black and white flowers on one side, and all black on the other (reversible!) side, but they come in all sorts of pretty hues. They’re adjustable, so they grow with baby, from cradled position to sitting up to wearing on the back. Even my massive, 6’3 husband wore the baby on the largest setting when she was a newborn. Rock on, Rockin’ Baby!

NIPPLES!:
Daisy: Lansinoh saved my life and boobs. The little purple tube full of happy goop was a balm of love, comfort, and all things good. Chafed, cracked, hurting boobies will love you for liberally applying this stuff. Great point about the gunk is the fact that you don’t have to wash it off to nurse – it’s safe for baby. I would apply a good amount after nursing, even when I wasn’t chapped or cracked – kept “them” healthy and moisturized. Wonderful, wonderful stuff. I also used the Lansinoh disposable nursing pads. They are thin; completely invisible under thin bras and t-shirts, and WOW are they absorbent. Lansinoh has no clue who I am, and they certainly didn’t provide me with anything, I just love them and have fond memories of the comfort their products brought to my udders. (Like, uh, not looking like I was perpetually in a wet t-shirt contest) (www.lansinoh.com)

Baby Feeding:
Violet: Trust me when I say that I’ve run the gamut of baby bottles. When Daisy recommended the Playtex Drop-Ins, I registered for every variation and portion of this bottle set. Unfortunately, Pterodactyl didn’t take to them, and collapsed the nipple. My big brother had used Dr. Brown’s bottles with his two kids, so I tried those next. Let’s just say that there are still some bottle innards somewhere in the bottom of my garbage disposal. Since I don’t have a Ph.D in baby bottle mechanics, I scrapped Dr. Brown’s pretty quickly. I tried the little bottles that came with my Medela, but they turned my kid into The Exorcist, yakking boob milk/formula across the house with projectile aptitudes. That’s when I found Born Free (www.newbornfree.com). Holy smokes, those are fantastic. We started with the glass bottles, and haven’t changed since! The babe couldn’t collapse the nipple. The (uncomplicated, easy-to-use) innards kept her gas-free, and glass is not only environmentally sound, but microwave safe, too.

Diaper Buying
Daisy: Diaper delivery: http://www.amazon.com. Can I get an “AMEN”??? I had three in diapers at once. My kids were good eaters. Due to the fundamental hypothesis of “What goes in must come out”, we went through diapers faster than you can imagine. By the time Handsome was about 4 months old, he, Diva, & Intuitive were all in the same size diaper. That was a happy day for Daisy. I ordered the mega sized box off of Amazon, and when I was a good girl, my mom would send me some as a present. Diapers as presents. Who would have thought that would be the best gift she could send?

Online Shopping:
Violet: I’m addicted to savings. I have a coupon binder, and religiously plan my grocery list to maximize my savings. Now that you know what a crack-head I am, take heed: my favorite sites are the discount ones! I love http://www.zulily.com and http://www.totsy.com. Both sites feature hoity-toity (that’s for you, Daisy’s Ma!) outfits and toys that a humble middle-class person like me would never otherwise be able to afford. The shipping isn’t as fast as, let’s say, Amazon.com, but at these prices, it’s worth the 2-4 week wait.

Corralling Your Kid:
Daisy: The One Step Ahead Superyard was such a great buy. So great in fact that I bought two of them and some extenders, to make a Super-Superyard. I was lucky enough that the layout of two houses I lived in while I needed to wrangle the kids was conducive to having the Superyard around furniture and between walls and furniture. I made a whole secure area and was able to contain kids and toys in a safe environment. Until the kids learned how to chuck their toys over the walls of the jail, anyways.
(Violet edit: I bought this shit, and it was fantastic. Even though my stubborn little Pterodactyl refuses to be caged anymore, the Superyard still serves a purpose: Buddy disconnected the “hexagon” and placed the fencing up against our home entertainment center. Now, the kid can’t turn the volume all the way up on the receiver or whack the PS3.)

Car Safety:
Violet: I know this comes as no surprise, but I absolutely love Pterodactyl’s Britax Marathon 70. It is secure as shit, comfortable for her, and it’ll grow with her until she’s a forward-facing 70 pounder. We never did the infant carrier system; we took her home from the hospital in that car seat. (At 5 lbs, 11 oz, thank you very much!) For those of you like Daisy who enjoy accessorizing, you can buy different seat covers to change up the pattern. Read the safety statistics (http://babyproducts.about.com/od/carseats/tp/topconvcarseats.htm) before you make a choice, but I’m sure you’ll agree that this car seat is the shit.

Cups That Won’t Ruin Your Life:
Daisy: Once my crew was done with sippy cups, I bought a never-ending supply of The First Years Take & Toss cups with lid & straws. Those things are amazing, and pretty indestructible for being labeled as “Disposable” OR “Reusable”. My kids STILL use them, without the lids & straws. They hold 10oz, and can be washed on the top rack in the dishwasher. Fun colors, easy to hold, easy to clean, and hard to spill. Those lids clamp on tight.

So what about you? What baby stuff has made your life easier? Please comment and share the joy with other Mommies. =]

 

© Daisy and Violet 2012. All Rights Reserved.

A Little Q&A

24 Feb

Welcome to Daisy & Violet’s little space on the internets. We figured that we would start off with a small bang. Nothing major, just a little question and answer session with each other. First up is Violet answering questions about me, Daisy.. Then, I answer the same questions about Violet. Check out our Mission Statement and the About Daisy & Violet section to learn a little bit more about us.

Daisy:

What is your favorite aspect of my personality?

Violet:

I love how methodical you are. To an outsider, you might look like a funky soccer mom tossing groceries in her cart, but I know how your mind works. I know you’re evaluating the nutritional content of each food, its price, which child eats that food, which child does not eat that food, and the myriad ways you could prepare it. You evaluate everything with that level of scrutiny: home décor, children’s clothes, books, homework assignments. I strive for your focus and attention to detail.

Daisy:

What could you stand to change about me?

Violet:

This one was hard for me. I was going to say your phone habits (like the fact you don’t return calls as often as I like), but then I had to rescind that because you return calls when your Mommy responsibilities are not pressing. I guess I would change your geographic location, and move you into the house next door.

Daisy:

 Why do you think our friendship has sustained for so long, through so many hurdles?

Violet:

We’re two peas in a pod. We have similar outlooks on life. We are inwardly catty and outspoken, but outwardly polite. We understand one another, and accept the other for who she is.

Daisy:

What makes me an excellent Mommy?

Violet:

What doesn’t make you an excellent Mommy? Your children are polite, intelligent, and bright as fuck. That is 100% nurture (because, as we know, their nature is only 50% you…). You have researched every book you read the kids, every school in your area, every bedtime routine in existence, every meal you plan, and synthesize your information to create a realm of mystical Mommyhood. Your routines are orderly. Your children are the opposite of picky eaters. Your kids treat you, their grandparents, their teachers, friends, aunts, and uncles with respect and reverence. Instead of creating this lifestyle with Nazi regiment, you’re as cuddly and sweet with your kids as the smelliest hippie around.

Daisy:

What do you think my first impression upon strangers is?

Violet:

I think they see you and your funky hair cut, your trendy clothes, and your various tattoos, and think you’re just some trendy Florida soccer mom. They don’t know how deeply your commitment to family and values runs.

Daisy:

What is something our readers might want to know about me?

Violet:

You can get down with some really hard rock music, old-school rap, or dorky Broadway crap and be equally happy.

Daisy:

If you could summarize me in one word, what would it be?

Violet:
Devoted. To Everything and Everyone. (Sorry for the four extra words. I’m nothing if not verbose.)

_______________


Violet:

What is your favorite aspect of my personality?

Daisy:

It never changes. You are who you are, no matter what. Through all the stages of your life, (that I’ve been around for) you’ve always been “Violet”. It’s kind of refreshing to feel like nothing has changed when I speak to you, even though years have passed and life HAS changed.

Violet:

What could you stand to change about me?

Daisy:

I would have to say your love for where you live! What I would give to have you, Buddy, and Pterodactyl closer. Preferably on a family compound, with a bridge connecting our homes.

Violet:

Why do you think our friendship has sustained for so long, through so many hurdles?

Daisy:

Because we want it to. We need each other, regardless of how many stupid fights we’ve had over trivial shit, we NEED each other. We balance each other out. Plus, no one would put up with you like I do, and vice versa. You are the mongolian to my motherfucker.

Violet:

What makes me an excellent Mommy?

Daisy:

To be completely honest, when you surprised me with the news that you were pregnant, I was a little scared. I wasn’t sure how you would react to pregnancy and having a newborn. I thought you might be one of those “Pregzillas” and a super insane worrying mother. You know the one I’m talking about. “Don’t get near the baby until you have washed your hands and put on your hazmat suit” or “No one can touch my sweet angel lovey muffin because we don’t know what germsie wormsies you might have”… The first time I heard you call the Pterodactly “Kid”, I was pretty stoked. You have taken to the mommy thing with ease. I have loved seeing you learn mommy-hood and coming to the realization that all the crap you thought you knew… is… well…. crap. I think the best part about your parenting skills is how relaxed you are. You go with the flow. Knowing you as I know you, that impresses me.

Violet:

What do you think my first impression upon strangers is?

Daisy:

Helllllllo preppy upper-middle class suburban mommy! I mean, seriously, you have a Vera Bradley diaper bag! ❤

Violet:

What is something our readers might want to know about me?

Daisy:

You are a bad ass bitch. You worked full time teaching at an “intense” high school, while pregnant, while going to school for your Masters. Then, you had a baby, complete with crazy delivery and complications, and a baby ending up in the NICU, went back to work soon after and back to school to finish your Masters, without missing a beat, all while being an amazing new mom. I don’t know HOW you did all that. BAD ASS BITCH.

Violet:

If you could summarize me in one word, what would it be?

Daisy:

Committed. You don’t do a damn thing half assed.

Next up, a little something from Violet. You will laugh.

Until next time, I wish you unicorns and rainbows. <3, Daisy

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